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in the civil rights movment." he joins us from washington. on the good to have you program. >> i wish i could be with you. wish we could have you in the studio. you have spent basically your life working on this icon a trilogy, and then you end up with a book that basically distills it all down. why did you do this? >> teachers have told me for many years that while they love the story, 800-page books are a little much to assign college students, let alone high school, and that weighed on me. the other thing is that it has been 50 years since the crest of the movement, and america's still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that -- america still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that. there are still many people hiding from the great benefits of the 1960's, so i wanted to do something to crystallize that. the lessons from the people in the civil rights era. tavis: what lessons do you think that the american public, by and large, as we approached the anniversary -- we will talk about that in a moment -- what do they still seem blind to? >> george wallace pledg
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
that could make a contentious battle. perez who heads the civil rights division at the justice department will have questions to answer, but the doj's decision to drop that now infamous voter intimidation case against the new black panther party, as well as a case headed to the supreme court that could have struck down his legal theories on racial discrimination, for more we're joined by editorial board member mary kissle and political diary editor jason riley. mary, you broke the story a year ago about the involvement in the st. paul case, we've since discovered a lot more details thanks to your digging. why did perez get himself involved in in case? >> well, the city of st. paul, minnesota was challenging, a theory of racial discrimination that tom perez and the justice department were using to accuse banks of discrimination, and so, he feared that if the court struck down this particular rule, that he would have to stop doing that, it would cut off a big source of funding, actually, for the justice department. >> so he leaned on st. paul to drop the case and they'd been litigating for
during the civil rights movement. at 10:00 p.m. eastern, our weekly "after words" program. david bernstein sits down with a a special guest. he concludes nights programming at 11:00 p.m. eastern with sandra day o'connor in her book out of order. stories from the history of the supreme court. as a booktv.org for more information on this weekend television schedule. >> you are watching booktv on c-span2. coming up next, fiona deans hallora recounts the life of thomas nast. a regular contributor to harvard weekly, he made the donkey and the elephant the symbols of the the political parties in our country. this is about 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good evening. welcome to the historical society. i want to thank you for joining us tonight. what i know will be a very interesting program. "thomas nast." he is the father of political cartoons. i want to thank you for being here. this is the first time in a while that we have had the ability to start an evening program. i appreciate you coming in and bring with us. our mission is to preserve and tell the history and culture.
than that. last year they were making san francisco the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the most dramatic shifts when the state took funding and reallocated to local and housing for state prisoners. our next speaker chief probation officers not only in san francisco
people of all colors. in 1968 dr. king told advocates the time had come to transition from a civil rights movement to a human-rights movement. meaningfully quality could not be achieved through civil rights alone without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, civil rights are an empty promise. in honor of dr. king and all those who labored to end the old jim crow i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, shelter, into food. what must we do to continue this movement? we must begin by telling the truth, the whole truth. we have got to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to recreate a cast like system in this country. we have got to be willing to tell this truth in our schools, in our churches and places of worship, behind bars and reentry c
. there is nothing civil about letting somebody without their right mind decompensate to the to point that they lose their lives and sometimes other people lose their lives. our mother recently had called me and said that her son had been on the streets because he also left their house and the police called her first thing in the morning. she hadn't seen him in a long time and he had paranoid schizophrenia. they said your son is in the hospital. we arrested him on a 51/50. he was walking naked in the street in the middle of the night talking to himself. the mother and father jumped in the car and went to the emergency room and by the time they got there, the hospital had released him. i don't understand this. it's just, you know, i'm not a lawyer and i wasn't in the mental health field before, i just, i don't understand it. the qualifications and criteria for a holder extreme and they are unrealistic. a person much be imminently danger to self or others or gravely disabled before they are picked up. if your shelter is under a freeway, if he knows of a garbage can that he can frequent, he's not grave
-- >> yes. and civil rights. he said to all of them, i agree with all of your positions. i want all of your things. but i have to tell you something, i'm not going to be able to do it. and i'm not going to do it. you're going to have to make me do it. he said that to them, make me do it. so fellow americans, that's our job. if we are calling ourselves citizens, that means we are participants in democracy. it is not that they sit back and they sit in some hall some place. we are the ones in charge. they are our servant. they are there to serve us. if they don't hear from us, then you know, who is going to win out are the money people. the gun manufacturers, national rifle association, people that grease the palms. that's who will win out. but this is what the nra is scared about tonight and gun manufacturers. there's a lot more of us than there are of them. >> no doubt. so they won't be able to hold us hostage. let's talk about something else you're doing, because i want to get this in. first i thought you were making house party part 4 but i discovered that's not what is going on. you are g
organizations who came together on this issue that represent our diverse ethnic community, civil rights, labor, social justice and religious organizations and ask for your support. madam clerk, could you call the roll. >> on item 35, supervisor mar? mar aye. supervisor tang? tang aye. supervisor wiener? wiener aye. supervisor avalos? avalos aye. supervisor breed? breed aye. supervisor campos? campos aye. supervisor chiu? chiu aye. supervisor cohen? cohen aye. supervisor kim? kim aye. there are nine ayes. >> the resolution is adopted. colleagues, we have one additional item on our calendar and that is our 3:30 special commendations related to women's history month. why don't i suggest that we recess for the next 10 minutes and reconvene at 3:30. with that, we are in recess.
in protecting civil rights, and this is an opportunity to continue to do so. thank you. the rest i mitt. -- submit. >> thank you, supervisor campos. supervisor kim. >> thank you. today i'm introducing a resolution to rename an alley way here in district 6 just a block away from city hall, the [speaker not understood] alley. and i am introducing this resolution with supervisor campos, wiener, and avalos. many of you may have been following in the press some of the recent comments that our former [speaker not understood] leader has made regarding lgbt members of his parliament. due to some of his strong comments and his unwillingness to apologize for it, we have been [speaker not understood] request in our office to consider the renaming of this alley way. it is just a one-block alley way in between van ness and polk street. and after looking at it and determining some of the cost and the scope of the work, we decided that it was worthwhile to move forward with this idea. as we consider what the renaming process would look like, the street's name was originally ivy street. we noted there
discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement live tonight at 8:00 eastern part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> jinger gibson is a congressional reporter with politic coe and here to talk to us about congress avoiding a shutdown but first we want to talk about what's been happening the last 18 hours on in the senate. tell us about the passing of the budget. how long did it take and why? >> the senate voted for more than 13 hours straight on the senate floor and finally arrived at 5:00 this morning on passage of a budget. the rules allow them to amend as much as they can. there are a couple of guys wanting to go until 7:00 or 8:00 this morning. luckily they stopped before that. host: for those who went to sleep at a decent hour and didn't see c-span's coverage ll night, what might they be surprised finding out what happened over night? guest: there were four that tic -- democrats voted against the democratic budget. the keystone pupe line was defeated and some amendment that is republicans were chairing that got done, things that dealt with climate change
about rights. economic rights, civil rights. and it's about women who are here and women who will come after us. it's also a framing issue in the debate about reproductive rights and aboring. >> i also want to go back to what robert is saying. i'm from arizona which is a heavy libertarian state. i come from a family with individuals like yourself are quite conservative and people of deep faith. i feel like it's totally appropriate and okay for you o have your faith and you to have your faith and you to have your faith. what i think is important in the debate is we go to the fundamental american values which is liberty. you have have your faith and you have your faith and you have your faith. and our government's job is to protect each person's liberty. >> and trust you to make the right decisions. >> so protecting your faith, protecting your beliefs and not infringing on someone else's. libertarian philosophy is the perfect philosophy to have. zl when we come back we're going to north dakota. you said you wanted your in utero daughter to have freedom. we also want to have a nerd land w
this equal protection idea. they were about race. >> scott: since the civil war. >> right. the historical case. there are parallels between these kinds of discrimination. here is another difference. in 1967 when the supreme court in loving versus virginia banned gay marriage, in that time, only 16 states retained such a ban. the previous decade plus, 14 states moved away from the bans. we still have a situation where 40 states prohibit same-sex marriage. that may change in four or five years. that is different with the mainstream. >> i would say one of the things that is interesting is how fast public opinion is moving. in the case of interracial marriage in 1967, there were polls showing lower levels of support when the supreme court acted than there are today. there is the fact that many states and one reason is a big regional divide. on the east coast and west coast, there is more sympathy than in the south and middle of the country. >> scott: that goes if they strike down prop 8, they have several options if they strike it down. more or less it is california only option or -- >> there
the civil rights movement. at 10 p.m. eastern we'll bring you our weekly "after words" program. this week david burstein, author of "fast future" sits down with host s.e. cupp. and we conclude tonight's prime time programming at 11 eastern with sandra day o'connor. her book is "out of order." visit booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week. bioethicist ezekiel emanuel recounts his upprescriptioning and how his immigrant parents produced three successful children including his brother rahm emanuel and ari emanuel, a hollywood agent, in "brothers emanuel." in "those angry days: roose svelte, lindbergh and america's fight over world war ii, lynne olson recounts world war ii. jeff chu presents his thoughts on religion and gay rights in "does jesus really love me: a gay christian's pilgrimage in search of god in america." in "forecast: what physics, meetology and science can teach us," mark buchanan explains how the ebb and flow of markets and the economy can relate to numerous fields of science. look for these
as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. with on his consultations parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that resulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. i hope your success will continue in your visit. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in jordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of jordan for their extreme warmth and hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless,
are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries. where is the combid gideon for this? >> it's not there. when you start caring about these issues, they expand. that's okay. the question that i will address and i have been interested in it since 1962. i'm quite mature. and been working on it my own little way. it has to do with the right to counsel in civil case. i will tell you 3 stories. if i give you the statistics, if i sit here and tell you 6 out of 10 middle class people who go to court do not have a lawyer or 8 out of 10 do not have a lawyer. i have diminished those people and in this culture that's one way to take care of the problem because it's almost gone when you hear it. i will tell you 3 stories. a us citizen born and raised in hawthorne california with a limited mental capacity, having lived in the united states, living with his mother and 3 other kids. got arrested on a small trespass. he entered what i can call a criminal factory known as the main jail
the civil- rights movement live from the virginia festival of the book, live tonight at 8:00 on c-span 2. >> "washington journal" continues. allison is here to discuss congressman's ethics. tell us about the role of the house and senate ethics committees. who makes the rules? house and the senate make their own rules how the ethics committee's proceed and it is different from normal committees. both of those committees are the only two committees in congress that have an equal number of democrats and republicans. when we think about how committee's work, house and the power that a chairman as about legislation or tabling things, that is not how the ethics committee works. both the chairman and a working member are supposed to work together from both parties and they are supposed to be some collegiality and agreement on how they move forward. when somebodygins makes a complaint to the committee. there is a format in which they have to do it. a member of the public and also make a complex but that will only act on it if a member of the house signed an affidavit saying this meets the standa
of the brave. they discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia festival of the book. tonight at 8:00 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> up next on booktv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very
their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia test festival of the book tonight at k58 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> here's a look at books being published this week. and youngest siblings a hollywood agent in "brothers emanuel "a memoir of an american family. in the angry days roosevelt, lindberg, and america's fight over world war ii recounting the political battle between american isolationist and interventionist during world war ii. jeff chu articles editor for fast company magazine present the thoughts on religious and gay rights.
the civil rights movement and because of the history of america and because he said several crucial phrases, essentially said that israel will never go away. so he sort of laid out the honey, then he went and gave the vinegar line saying you have to actually now do a few things you don't like, and here they are. he did a good job from the israeli critics' perspective. >> the palestinians aren't happy, the disproportionate amount of time in israel and what he asked of the two leaders, made no public demand of netanyahu yet in israel he talked about the settlement issue. it is different than four years ago, on the arab street, including ra mal a, thought it would be different. now the israelis think we understand each other better here. >> one thing the president succeeded doing, strategically very important, john, the president set up a phone call between the prime minister of israel and the leader of turkey, the prime minister, and they both agreed turkey, a nate oh ally, israel a close ally, they were going to try to normalize the relationship. it is important for the region and the u.s. a
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
engage, a large part of the population wouldn't engage with civil rights. then they said we have to find a way to do this. there's no reason why immigration reform and rand paul says hispanics are natural republicans which they used to say that about black people too. lost of people in america have faith in family and are not republicans. republicans should be natural to immigration reform. many depends on what kind of immigration reform. they could favor immigration reform that brings in large number of people driving down the wage rate who don't become citizens for an awfully long time and stop the hugest big government project i can think of which is building a useless wall between america and mexico. there's nothing conservative actually about the immigration, the nature of the immigration conversation. >> congressman i want you to respond to that. i want to talk about the devil in the details. where we are in the house and counter pose to where we are on guns right after we take a break. u can't go wrong loving i. vo: from the classic lines u can't go wrong loving i. to the elegant
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil rights abuse. we need to make certain we are focused on the greatest revenue -- on the greatest american public. that really is in hansard are supporters of the -- in the hands of the prosecutors at the department of justice. >> what we are going to do is we are going to introduce the bill after -- and i am going to ask to your comments -- after the recess. it will be the bipartisan two of us. to set up a national commission made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative states. they have had to respond to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. ofare looking for a chairman stature who can come and take a year to report. i think our present system is dysfunctional and i sense there are very few people working the prisons. industry has been decimated because of congress. we tried to get prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made in the united states. there are only two baseball cap manufacturers i
civil rights legislation in 1964 was 101 years. it didn't happen overnight, and so i think it's going take a while. but, as has been said, "a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." i see the steps are beginning. >> god is mentioned a lot in your book. >> i think we've made a real mistake here in not realizing-- we spoke of history a moment ago-- that great men and women of our past, creative people, political people, all had a familiarity with scripture, with the ten commandments, the sermon on the mount, the golden rule, the way life works. now i'm not calling upon everybody to embrace my church or my beliefs, but i am saying that there are certain truths. ted koppel said some years ago in a remarkable speech at duke university on the ten commandments, "the truth is not a polite tap on the shoulder, it's a howling reproach." and he also said we've actually convinced ourselves that slogans will save us: "shoot up if you must, but use a clean needle." "enjoy sex whenever and with whomever you wish, but wear a condom." and then he said no, the answer is no; not no beca
of democracy and human rights and civil society, outside its own borders now for 200 years, just took on anmpossible taskn iraq. it just wasn't going to acceptst that. and i would say much more likely than that the american-- tank american influence will be incremental improvements in what is now a pretty dire situation, is that it's very likely to get worse, and lead to civil war, and it's not even clear that the most fundamental issue:00 is who governs in iraq, the majority shi'a, or the minority sunni, it's not even clear that that's, a settled issue, and if isn't a settled issue, and the sunnise prevail inyriand back theirl brothers across the borders of iraq and anbar, you may very well see a civil war, at least as brutal as we were witnessing in 2007 at the time time of the surge. >> rose: we will come back to manies thof point. >> or beloved late friend richard holbrooke once asked me. what did i think? what was my sounded bite about this war. i said we will did due course learn whether it was an open success or -- >> noble. >> he object toltd notification of noble failure.ct h
before taking questions from the media. syria was their main topic. right now, that country's civil war has pushed about 460-thousand refugees across jordan's borders. abdullah says that number will probably double by the end of the year. the president says he will 200-million dollars in aid to help jordan deal with israeli prime minister apologized to turkey for a deadly raid on a flotilla, three years ago. that raid is seen in this video released at the time forces. eight turkish activists were killed when commandoes stormed the ship-- which was attempting to carry aid to gaza. turkey's prime minister has accepted the apology. this marine that worked at this candid it school shot and killed two other marines a man and woman and then killed himself. the body was found late last night and the other two bodies were found later. >> if you are enjoying that spring sunshine when we come back for will talk about the weekend forecast and possibly some rainfall and the seven day forecast. >> coming up the closing numbers on wall street. and a woman has an ipad but it is a fake from wal-mart. a
you often have to do it repeatedly and through outrageous conduct and someone could sue you in civil court. there is an aerial surveillance case involving trade secrets that came out in favor of the plaintiff. >> could someone by one right now? >> you could go -- >> get a certification from the at a a? >> i don't know if this is put limits to call a drone but for $300, something, an aerial vehicle you could control with your i've had and fly around your neighborhood and likely you are not going to be running against -- not going to get sued in all likelihood. the faa bans commercial use of jerome today but that ban is said to be relaxed in 2015 and of course have an economic incentive. in my personal view to the extent you are interested this is a wonderful thing because this technology is deeply transformative and basically flying smart phones. once of private industry get their hand on these things we will see some great wonders but we will never get there unless we place some limits and privacy because of our reaction to these drones we are not going to avail ourselves of the tech
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
marriage and opposes changing ohio's constitution to allow for civil unions. well, so much for that. and he's far from the first republican to feel the heat from the fringe. joining me right now is msnbc contributor ron reagan and errol lewis. first, i'll comment on that one. kasich is a fine guy, a bit of a maverick and he's had a tough life in many ways and he says what comes to mind and he's thinking out loud and he says you know what? i'm not ready to go all of the way on my position, but civil union, i can live with that and civil you know knows and he said it again and within hours his flack comes out with a written statement to make sure it's getting picked up saying he didn't say what we heard him just say, ron. what's going on here? >> he gave is straight. he seemed to demonstrate that on the one hand he doesn't really have a position that he is susceptible to pressure from the right and he also demonstrated and this is relevant to the republican party as a whole that he's way behind the curve of history now. the public, as a whole is moving in a pretty clear wye this issue and mr.
the tape. >> i do not support gay marriage but i do support civil unions. >> lgbt are our colleagues, our soldiers, our friends, our loved ones, and they are full and equal citizens and deserve the rights of citizenship. that includes marriage. >> bill: so sincere. >> she looks like she is making a hostage tape. it looks like anderson cooper and ellen degeneres are off to the side pointing elephant guns at her taking pictures of her. it is so cheesy. it looks so phony. >> bill: almost every politician flip-flops on issues these days they're all evolving. >> she is in favor of every marriage but her own. she is the secretary of state. i want to know more about benghazi and not about bedrooms. i don't need to hear that i need to hear what's going on. >> bill: definitely a flip flop. gutfeld you picked bobby brown used to be married to whitney houston. dopey group 1953. >> voice to men. washed up singer, a druggy, a drunk, for all accounts a loser. got his third dui. went to court. he he was supposed to serve 55 days. got out in nine hours. >> why? >> because they claim as always overcrowdin
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, 2008 presidential candidate had backed civil unions but never made a full endorsement for marriage. she said it's about equality. listen. >> gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights. the united states should be a leader in defending those rights. >> do you think this is a move to influence the supreme court like the american academy of pediatrics trying to get their opinions out there before the courts decide. >> what you see from hillary clinton, american academy of pediatrics, and others this is an issue that is in front of the american people the way it never has been and a lots of folks want to make sure their position is clear. you've seen more and more folks coming out for equality. that's where our country is going. >> we showed the polls showing how quickly things have changed over the past four years do you see that sense of public opinion changing? >> i think public opinion is changing and that's why we shouldn't have the supreme court stop the conversation. what we don't need is for the supreme court to artificially stop the democratic process, which is wha
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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